Ocean Engineering and Sciences

New Undergraduate Student Handbook

Message From Department Head

Dear Student,

We are very pleased that you are attending Florida Tech this fall, and I want to welcome you personally. Your studies will be administered by the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences, located in the Link Building, named in honor of Edwin A. Link—a pioneering undersea explorer. The Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences (OES) is firmly dedicated to an integrated education, as you can see from our mission statement at the foot of this letter.

OES is one of six departments in the College of Engineering & Computing, and is perhaps the most “applied science” academic unit within the college. Our 19 laboratories and facilities are spread out in four buildings on campus and at nearby sites, but you will find them easily enough on the campus map. Many of the professors you will have teach courses in at least two of our three programs: oceanography, ocean engineering, and environmental sciences (which includes meteorology). In addition, because we offer both undergraduate and graduate degrees, our students interact at all levels rather than in the isolated circumstances of the usual college or university. If your family or friends have Internet access, tell them about our home page on http://www.fit.edu/dmes and don’t forget to click on “what’s new”!

We have over 200 undergraduate and graduate students, 15 all-Ph.D. regular faculty, more than a dozen adjunct faculty, and eight professional and staff members in the department. We are all here to support your education and research, and we want you to feel free to call upon any one of us as your studies progress. Although each of our programs have chairs (Dr. John G. Windsor, Jr., oceanography and environmental sciences, and Dr. Steve Wood, ocean engineering) who direct most of the academic activities, please feel free to contact me as necessary, too. My door is always open, and you are welcome at most any time.

We are pleased to have you as part of the OES family.

Yours truly,

Thomas D. Waite
Professor and Department Head

Our mission is to integrate oceanography, ocean engineering, environmental science, meteorology, management, and related academic concentrations into interdisciplinary knowledge-based solutions for vital contemporary issues through education, research and service.

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DEPARTMENTAL HISTORY

Florida Institute of Technology was founded in 1958, and had earned SACS accreditation by 1964. In 1966, the Department of Oceanography was launched with an undergraduate program in physical oceanography. In 1968 the university established the Hydrospace Technical Institute, HTI, located in Cocoa Beach, which later was moved to Jensen Beach and the name changed to the School of Marine and Environmental Technology, SOMET. Biological and chemical oceanography curricula were added by 1971. The ocean engineering program began in 1972 when the department became the Department of Oceanography and Ocean Engineering; in 1979 ocean engineering became ABET accredited. SOMET's faculty, students and programs were moved to Melbourne when the Jensen Beach Campus was closed in 1986.

Environmental science was added to the university's offerings ca. 1976. In 1990 the program in environmental science was transferred to the department, at which time it was organized into the Department of Oceanography, Ocean Engineering and Environmental Science. The department became the Division of Marine and Environmental Systems (DMES), one of four divisions in the reorganized College of Engineering, in 1993. An additional baccalaureate curriculum in marine environmental studies became available in 1994; meteorology became part of the division's undergraduate offerings in 1995. In 2000, DMES was renamed the College of Engineering & Computing's Department of Marine and Environmental Systems, and in 2001 an undergraduate specialty in coastal zone management was added to the oceanography curriculum.

Graduate programs were established more or less in parallel with the undergraduate curricula: a Master's degree in physical oceanography was the only graduate program in the late 1960's; master's in biological, chemical and geological oceanography were added in 1971, 1976 and 1980, respectively. An M.S. program in environmental science was initiated in 1976, ocean engineering was established by 1977, coastal zone management by 1978, environmental resource management in 1993, and meteorology in 1999. Doctor of philosophy degree programs started with oceanography in 1974, ocean engineering in 1987 and environmental science in 1990. Over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate degrees have been granted since our founding.

During the years 1997-2002, a capital campaign resulted in almost $2,500,000 in permanent endowments for DMES. Income from this endowment fund the Doherty Visiting Professor, the Link Fellowship, the Snowdon Fellowships, the Skelly Fellowships, the Clayton Fellowship and the Waters Fellowship - the latter largely underwritten by alumni, faculty and friends of the department. Growing endowments are the key to attracting and retaining the best students and faculty at Florida Tech.

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NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

Florida Tech will provide you with a wide variety of career and educational options. It will also provide you with the opportunity to develop and grow both as a student and as a person. College, however, requires discipline, self-motivation and hard work.

Students who are successful in college are not only self-motivated and hard working, they also know how to learn. They know that it's important to be organized and they know how to manage their time. They know how to study, take good notes, and to read a textbook. They know how to memorize information and they know strategies that help them choose the right answers on tests. They also know how to get help when they need it.

This booklet and our Student Orientation program are intended to provide you with information on beginning your university experience, to ease your transition from high school or community college to university, and to insure your successful matriculation into the academic community. Our goals are to:

  • Introduce you to the physical environment of Florida Tech and the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences Systems faculty and staff.
  • Assist you in developing an understanding of the demands of college: the academic expectations, social adjustments and community standards of Florida Tech.
  • Acquaint you with the skills required to become independent learners and effective students.
  • Introduce you to resources and services available at Florida Tech.
  • Provide you with opportunities to meet fellow students and establish relationships with members of the Florida Tech community.
  • Create an atmosphere that is educational, interactive and fun.
  • Assist you in achieving your career goals, dreams, and objectives.
  • We strongly encourage you to take advantage of all we offer during orientation week.

The Academic Support Center (ASC) is here to serve you and do everything possible to assure that you are successful in your studies at Florida Tech. We are located adjacent to the teaching auditorium (P-133) of the Evans Library Pavilion. The Learning Center is at the south entrance and the director's office is at the north entrance. At the Academic Support Center, you can discuss academic concerns with the director; request one-on-one tutoring for your courses; receive help in composition or in writing research papers, reports or speeches; enroll in a student success course; attend small group study sessions; review and improve math, English and study skills, via self-help materials; access disability services; or find out about the services available to you on campus. Feel free to visit our center or call ext. 8009 for more information. We want to help you achieve your goals at Florida Tech.

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INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences (OES), which administers the programs in oceanography, ocean engineering, and environmental sciences (including meteorology). This unique combination of science, engineering, and management provides the interface necessary to meet the challenge of maintaining our high standard of living without compromising the environment in which we live. Ocean engineers must design more efficient and safer systems with which to obtain valuable resources from the sea, to provide effective transportation systems, to protect coastal areas from storms and erosion, and to provide the Navy with state of the art systems to maintain peace and protect maritime interests. Oceanographers and environmental scientists are responsible for studying physical, chemical, geological and biological systems, so they may advise the engineers, managers and politicians how to work in harmony with environment and not against it. Meteorologists study, analyze and forecast the weather; conduct research in climatology, atmospheric electricity and remote sensing; and interact with oceanographers, ocean engineers, and other scientists, engineers and managers on atmospheric aspects of the earth system.

This short introduction aims to:

  • Define the activities of the four disciplines
  • Provide you with post-graduation opportunities for each discipline
  • Introduce you to the faculty, staff and their activities

THE OCEANOGRAPHER

Oceanography is the science that deals with the ocean environment. It involves gathering knowledge and understanding in the areas of biology, coastal zone management, chemistry, geology, meteorology and physics related to the oceans. Biological oceanography is the study of the multitude of plants and animals of the oceans, their interactions with one another and their interaction with the ocean environment. Coastal zone management applies sound scientific and engineering knowledge to sustaining environmental quality where the land meets the sea. Chemical oceanography is the study of natural and human-induced chemical components in the sea and their influence on marine organisms and the environment. Geological oceanography includes the study of the processes that formed the ocean basins and dunes, and sediment transport and deposition. Physical oceanography includes the study of waves, currents and tides and their influence on beaches, inlets and coastal structures. All options in oceanography take the same basic core courses, so it is important to have a strong background in science and mathematics, including chemistry, physics and precalculus or calculus, if possible. In your junior and senior year at Florida Tech, you will take basic courses and labs in each of the oceanography disciplines. During the summer following the junior year, you will take Marine Field Projects, which is designed to give you real-life experience in field and laboratory studies; this includes a 4-day cruise aboard the R/V Delphinus.

Subject areas of common interest to oceanographers include the following:

  • Coastal erosion: inlets, shorelines, sediments transport
  • Marine habitats: seagrass, coral reefs, water column
  • Water quality/pollution: pesticides, sewage, turbidity, red tides, eutrophication
  • Artificial reefs: composition, structure, impact, utilization
  • Deep sea chemistry: hydrothermal vents, submarine volcanism
  • Remote sensing: vegetation, wetlands, productivity, ocean circulation
  • Air-sea interaction: meteorology, surface currents, storms, wave generation
  • Waste management: characterization, utilization, disposal
  • Global environment: population, resources, habitats
  • Marine meteorology: winds, precipitation, hurricanes, climate change
  • Earth system science: role of the hydrosphere in global change

What are the Degree Requirements

While all options take the same basic oceanography core courses, each option has complementary courses which make it unique. All options take at least one year each of calculus, chemistry, and physics and at least one semester of biology. Students in the Biological Oceanography option take the freshman year of biology plus invertebrate zoology and may select other courses in biology as technical electives. Both Biological and Chemical Oceanographers take organic chemistry, but the Chemical Oceanography majors take additional chemistry beyond organic. Physical Oceanography majors require additional courses in mathematics, physics, and dynamical oceanography, and Coastal Zone Management add business and economic courses to their studies.

Where Do You Go From Here

While most of our graduates go into the work force, a number go on to graduate school. Our graduates have been accepted into graduate programs at major oceanographic institutions such as Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, and Texas A&M. With an oceanography degree, you will possess skills in many areas making you more marketable for a wider range of job opportunities than those more narrowly trained. Oceanographers may work for environment consulting firms and private and public research organizations; others are employed by local, state or federal government agencies engaged in environmental and/or pollution studies.

THE OCEAN ENGINEER

Ocean engineering is a multidisciplinary field that blends elements of naval architecture, marine engineering, civil engineering, oceanography and marine meteorology to address the special problems of working in the ocean and on the ocean floor. Ocean engineers deal with the design, construction, operation and maintenance of:

  • Mobile and fixed exploration and production platforms
  • Port and coastal facilities
  • Ocean pipelines
  • Deep water mooring and underwater vehicles
  • Habitats
  • Instrumentation and protection of marine materials

The Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences combines the expertise of ocean scientists, engineers and managers. Engineers must not only devise means of utilizing the ocean’s resources to meet humankind’s expanding needs, but do so in ways that protects the environment and conserve its resources.

There are many challenges facing the ocean engineer. For example, development of coastal areas has required beach stabilization, the construction of ports, breakwaters and recreational facilities; the offshore oil industry is looking at more cost effective and safer ways to extract hydrocarbons from the reserves lying under the seabed, using subsea systems and remotely operated and autonomous vehicles; oil tankers are being designed with double bottoms to reduce the risks associated with accidents, such as the Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound (1989) and the Braer in the Shetland (1993); the Navy, merchant marine, and recreational boat industry are investigating new hull designs and construction materials to produce faster and more economic ships; hydrographic engineers conduct marine surveys to make nautical charts, predict sediment transport, and locate objects on the sea floor, such as wreckage from TWA Flight 800 (1996).

What can I do in Florida Tech’s Ocean Engineering program?

  • Coastal engineering
  • Hydrographic engineering
  • Shipbuilding
  • Oil exploration
  • Underwater technology
  • Naval architecture
  • Ocean surveying
  • Marine materials/Corrosions studies
  • Boat design
  • Ocean instrument design

What can I do with a degree in ocean engineering?

Work at places like the following, where Florida Tech graduates have been hired:

  • Maritime Administration
  • Indian River County, Fla.
  • Army Corps of Engineers
  • U.S. Navy Coast Guard
  • Ingalls Shipyard
  • SonTek
  • Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock
  • Western Geophysical

Or you can continue your education in graduate studies at schools, such as:

  • University of Rhode Island
  • Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Florida Atlantic University
  • Texas A&M University
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography

THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST

Environmental science is the area of applied science concerned with the relationship between human activities and the supporting environment. Environmental scientists provide the scientific framework for rational environmental decisions. The program is solidly based on course work in biology, chemistry, humanities, mathematics and physics, combined with specialized environmental sciences and engineering courses. Theoretical concepts are reinforced by laboratory programs and multimedia field studies.

What can you study in Florida Tech’s Environmental Science program:

  • Aquatic biology: natural systems and the impact of man
  • Aquatic chemistry: water contamination and interactions with biological systems
  • Air pollution: natural and man-made pollutants
  • Solid and hazardous wastes: recycling and conservation
  • Remote sensing: studying the earth from satellites and aircraft
  • Meteorology: weather effects

What can you do when you graduate?

Find jobs such as:

  • Environmental planner, chemist or resource manager
  • Wetlands specialist
  • Meteorologist
  • Recycling manager
  • Aquatic biologist
  • Graduate school

At companies such as:

  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Florida Water Management Districts
  • Dynamac at Kennedy Space Center
  • Walt Disney World Inc.
  • Florida Department of Environmental Protection
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration

THE METEOROLOGIST

Meteorology is that area of the environmental sciences concerned with the effects of earth’s atmosphere on human activities and the effect of humankind on the air. The program is solidly based on course work in chemistry, humanities, mathematics and physics, combined with specialized environmental science and meteorology courses. This combination of sciences and humanities, coupled with technical electives during the junior and senior years, allows the meteorology major to build a strong foundation with enough flexibility to meet his or her individual interests. Theoretical concepts are reinforced by laboratory programs and multimedia field studies, and by a summer project between the junior and senior years.

Central Florida is a transition zone between a tropical climate to the south and a humid subtropical climate to the north. The Florida Peninsula is surrounded by oceanic currents of the Gulf Stream System that modify the state’s weather, which is punctuated by thunderstorms, lightning and hurricanes. The Cape Canaveral area, where Florida Tech is located, has numerous atmospheric sciences activities, including the NEXRAD facility of the NOAA National Weather Service, the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Weather Squadron, the NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Florida Solar Energy Center, and several major engineering companies. Finally, the broadcast facilities of National Public Radio station WFIT add to the educational experience.

What Can You Do at Florida Tech?

  • Interact with meteorologists from NOAA National Weather Service, NASA Kennedy Space Center, the U.S. Air Force, National Hurricane Center and the Florida Solar Energy Center
  • Study with ocean scientists and engineers, climatologists, aviators, hydrologists and environmentalists
  • Investigate weather in space and on other planets
  • Marine meteorology cruises on board the 60 ft. R/V Delphinus
  • Analyze information from satellites, radar, ships, rockets, balloons and aircraft
  • Broadcast the weather on National Public Radio Station WFIT

What Can You Do With Your Meteorology Degree?

  • Weather forecasting for rocket launches, aviation, agriculture, maritime, and other activities
  • Prevention, investigation and prediction of natural hazards damage
  • Government civil and military operations and support physical oceanography, severe storms and computer modeling of climate and weather
  • Television or radio weather broadcasting
  • Professional membership in the American Meteorology Society
  • Graduate school

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WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM FLORIDA TECH

In most instances, people experience greater success when they know what to expect. At Florida Tech, expect to find the following:

Varying class sizes

Class sizes can range from 12-60 students. While most classes are less than 30, class sizes vary depending on the course (the largest classes are usually the required core courses).

The need for critical thinking

You will be expected to learn and understand what you read. You will also be asked to draw conclusions, form opinions and evaluate the ideas of others.

Tests and homework

Most instructors give homework assignments; these assignments are often checked and graded by graduate student (teaching) assistants (GSAs). Undergraduate students, who want to get good grades, do the assignments independently; they know they will be quizzed or tested on the material at some point.

The need for personal responsibility

In college, you have a tremendous amount of freedom, however faculty and/or GSAs do notice if you are not going to class or not doing your assignments. Nevertheless, you are expected to be responsible for your own academic progress.

Consequences for low grades

Poor grades are a waste of time and money. Although you can retake courses, this puts you behind in your program plan. Check your catalog for procedures. If your GPA falls below 2.0, you will be placed on academic probation.

Less time in class/more emphasis on independent study

Your instructors will present material in class; however, you are expected to do most of your learning on your own. The general rule is: For every one hour you spend in class, you should spend three hours out of class reading, studying and completing assignments.

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WHAT FLORIDA TECH EXPECTS FROM YOU

Just as you have expectations of what a particular course may have to offer, your professors have expectations of what you’ll learn and accomplish. Your professors know what it takes to become a professional in your field, and they expect you to be committed to the challenge. To succeed, you must do the following:

Attend class regularly

Some students make the mistake of thinking that they do not have to attend class if they don’t want to. Their reasoning is that since they are paying tuition to take the class, they can decide whether or not to attend. That is immature and unprofessional thinking, as well as being a tremendous waste of your money and your time. The university policy on attendance is stated in your catalog. All freshmen are required to attend all classes. A professor may consider absences and lateness in determining the grade for a course. If possible, get to class early. Use this time to interact with the professor or your fellow classmates and review your notes. Your attendance and lack of tardiness will help demonstrate your commitment to excellence. Don’t be late to class.

Be attentive and take notes

That is how you get the most out of each class. Participate in class discussions and activities. It is inappropriate to converse with your neighbor while the professor is speaking. This is viewed as a personal insult to the professor, and disturbs the other students. It is reasonable to expect that you will spend twelve or more hours per week attending lectures. Unless you have a magnificent auditory memory, it will be necessary to take notes. One of the instructor’s major tasks is to distill the essence of many sources of information for the student––take advantage of their efforts.

Read your textbook

Preview the material to be presented before you attend class. You might choose to read it thoroughly, particularly if you have limited prior knowledge of the subject. Having a familiarity with the subject matter will aid in your understanding of the material.

Maintain a positive attitude toward class

Your attitude can make or break your performance in a class. Students talk about professors and courses, and you’re sure to hear conflicting opinions. But remember, that’s all they are––opinions. A bad teacher for another may be the best teacher for you. We all learn differently and have personality preferences. Decide for yourself.

Take all classes seriously

Students often wonder why they’re required to take classes that seem peripheral or irrelevant to their interests. It’s far too early in your development to draw such conclusions. You have no way of knowing how future classes and research opportunities might stimulate you to expand or alter your career goals. A course that seemed “irrelevant” at the time you took it may very well turn out to have provided you with tools, skills and perspectives that are vital for your developing interests.

Take advantage of office hours

Faculty have designated office hours for the purpose of interacting with class students and advisees. They will be delighted to talk to you about your progress in a course, your program of study, or about your development as a professional. Don’t be shy about asking for assistance in understanding course material. Virtually every student can benefit by seeking such assistance. A conference with the professor can be very helpful in understanding difficult subjects. The professor can also make recommendations about how to focus your study efforts and how to get additional tutoring or special assistance.

Relationship with your professors

As a student, you will develop a special relationship with your professors. This does not necessarily mean that it will be personal or wonderful. Rather, it means that it will be one that requires good working dynamics at the academic level. Your professors are professionals in their field, and your job is to learn from your professors. They are an integral part of your education, and have a great deal to teach you. Learn from them. Respect their knowledge, even if you don’t like them or their system of delivery. Learning from the negative can be just as valuable as learning from the positive. It is your responsibility to take maximum advantage of educational opportunities.

Learn from your mistakes

The prerequisite for mastery in most disciplines is the willingness to try something new, and to try it over and over. More often than not, you will try, not do as well as you expected, correct your errors, try again and maybe do a bit better. The key is that you keep trying. Success doesn’t come easily for most people. To become good at something, to become an expert, takes lots of hard work.

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POLICY STATEMENT ON PLAGIARISM

Examples of academic misconduct in the form of plagiarism have arisen within the department within the past several years. This statement is designed to explicitly define plagiarism and to describe the consequences to a student of committing plagiarism.
Plagiarism is described in a recent article in Science (26:631) as "the theft of ideas." Another recent discussion on misconduct in science gives a fuller description (Schachman, H. K. 1993, Science 261:148-149).

Whereas plagiarism is described in the [National Academy of Sciences] report as "using the ideas or words of another person without giving appropriate credit," Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary defines "plagiarize" as follows: "to steal and pass off as one's own (the ideas or works of another); to present as one's own an idea or product derived from an existing source." Because of the increasing focus on "intellectual property" in recent years, plagiarism is best defined as "misappropriation of intellectual property." Defined in this way, plagiarism not only encompasses those cases in which sentences or phrases are used without attribution but also includes unauthorized use of ideas, data, and interpretation obtained during the course of the grant review process or the review of scientific papers being considered for publication (Schachman, op.cit.).

At Florida Tech, plagiarism constitutes grounds for academic dismissal from the university. The university catalog states: "Student conduct that violates the legal or ethical standards of the university may result in mandatory withdrawal from all classes and denial of permission to register in future terms for either a definite or indefinite period of time. Examples of misconduct that could result in these actions include cheating, plagiarism..."

A student is expected to use his or her own words in any required paper or laboratory report, and if there is a use of someone else's words, ideas, data, figures, or any other intellectual property, it must be properly identified and attributed to the author. The verbatim use of any sentence or phrase from another person's work must be identified by quotation marks and by a proper citation to the original work from which it was taken. A change of one word in a sentence does not alter the fact that you are copying another individual's work and this still would constitute plagiarism. However, some degree of similarity to the original work is generally inevitable when you are reporting about the results of someone else's work.

To insure that there is no doubt about the issue, several illustrative examples are provided below. The first sentence from the abstract to a paper by J. M. Burkholder et al. (J.M. Burkholder, et al., Nature, 358:407410) is used.

A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.

If you were to say in your paper:

A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.

or :

There has been a worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years which has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.
then these statements would constitute plagiarism. The first case is a verbatim inclusion of an author's text without attribution. The second changes only a few words, and the entire thought structure of the original author remains intact.

A correct attribution would be:

Burkholder, et al. (1992) have noted "A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause."
Describing this information in your own words might take the form:

There has been a sharp increase in the number of toxic phytoplankton blooms from many areas of the coastal ocean in the last 20 years. The pattern of increase in toxic algal blooms appears correlated with incidents of fish diseases and unexplained fish mortality (Burkholder et al., 1992).

Note that even though the text has been greatly changed, the basic information is derived from Burkholder et al. (1992) and must be attributed.

Copying figures for inclusion in a term paper without attributing a source would also be plagiarism.

A student found to have committed plagiarism will receive a grade of zero on the paper and an F for the course, and the case will be turned over to the university administration for possible dismissal from the university.

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ADVISOR SYSTEM

The Faculty Advisor

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who is a full-time member of your department’s faculty. Each faculty member takes this responsibility very seriously, and represents your primary contact and source of information during your academic career. You will meet your faculty advisor during the initial departmental meeting of the Student Orientation program. The faculty advisor monitors your academic progress toward your degree. Each advisor is familiar with the departmental and university degree requirements, and is prepared to counsel you regarding all academic matters, including selection of elective courses appropriate for your program of study and career goals.

Prior to graduation each semester, you are required to meet with your advisor, thus ensuring that courses are scheduled in the appropriate order, all academic policies are met and that the schedule is in accordance with your academic needs and goals.

Your advisor is one of the most important people for you to know. It is also important for them to know you. In addition to serving as your academic program counselor, your advisor can offer advice on any academic matter, including study methods, research opportunities, summer programs (both at Florida Tech and elsewhere) and career opportunities. You will ultimately need letters of recommendation when you apply to graduate schools, or for a job. By knowing your academic record, as well as your motivation, interests and abilities, your advisor represents one of the best sources for such a letter. Your advisor and other faculty members have many personal contacts in academic institutions, government agencies and business. Faculty frequently gets notices from these contacts about job and graduate school openings––if you get to know them well, it will be easy for them to help you search for positions.

Your Faculty Advisor, and all other professors, maintain office hours during the academic year. These hours (usually five hours per week) are set aside in the faculty member’s schedule to meet with students, and are posted outside their office door and in the departmental office. It is best to meet with your advisor during these scheduled times, although it is generally possible to meet at other times, if necessary. By scheduling an appointment, you can be sure that your advisor will have the appropriate materials on hand (such as your student file) and will be prepared to respond to your needs. Scheduling an appointment will also help avoid time conflicts with other students who have appointments. If your appointment involves registration, dropping or adding a course, changing majors, or any administrative matter requiring a form, pick up the appropriate form from the departmental office when you schedule the appointment. The departmental secretaries can assist you in getting the correct forms. Complete as much of the information required on the form as you can before meeting with your advisor.

Communications with your advisor are very important. When you schedule appointments with your advisor, be sure to bring any documentation relative to the matter to be discussed. You should expect your advisor to communicate information to you. Periodically, curricula are reviewed and changes are made with the best interest of the student in mind. When you visit your advisor for registration counseling, your advisor will inform you of those changes and make the appropriate substitutions on your program flow chart. The flow chart lists all the courses required for your degree. A copy of this flow chart will be given to you when you register at Florida Tech for the first time. The original is maintained in your departmental file, and is updated each semester. When you register, you should either bring your copy of the flow chart so that it can be updated, or you can update it yourself to monitor your progress toward your degree.

The Faculty Advisor System at Florida Tech is unique in that you have constant access to a professional who is directly involved in your area of study. Each advisor can provide you with a wealth of information regarding your academic career and beyond. Get to know your advisor and let your advisor get to know you. Each of the faculty constantly hears from alumni, who were their advisees, and we want to continue that through you. We are proud of the success of our students and want to hear of yours, both at Florida Tech and in your future career.

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MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD PROJECTS

The Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences at Florida Institute of Technology offers a unique curriculum of undergraduate marine studies, the highlight of which is Marine Field Projects or Environmental Field Projects, which are intensive, summer field and laboratory programs where basic classroom knowledge is applied to solve real world problems. Three main elements are included in the program:

  • The design, construction and testing of an ocean engineering project is required of the ocean engineering students.
  • Estuarine- and coastal-based investigations of physical, geological, chemical and biological phenomena, and their relationship to weather and climate are required of oceanography, environmental science and meteorology students.
  • An ocean cruise investigating processes off the east coast of Florida is required of the oceanography and ocean engineering students.

The highlights of these investigations are presented during the summer at the Field Projects Symposium.

Ocean engineering projects include the redesign and construction of the hull, propulsion and safety systems of a human powered submarine; the design and construction of a SLICE-type vessel; the design and construction of the diver submersible to assist the diver in his operations, by providing a transportation platform to carry both the diver and their equipment; and the design and construction of Flettner rotors to propel a ship model utilizing wind energy.

During the Field Projects 2001 Symposium, oceanography, environmental science and meteorology students address three areas of local interest. Baseline studies of seagrass beds in anticipation of environmental restoration projects are key to knowing how effectively we are managing our resources. Similarly, the evaluation of water quality in Crane Creek after the 1998 sediment dredging will offer some insight to the effectiveness of the dredging process in improving local water quality. Local weather and climate is of great importance in understanding trends in these data. Finally, the last focus will be on coastal processes and changes in beaches.

The ocean cruises this year emphasized inlet hydrodynamics and artificial reef investigations in near coastal waters of Brevard, Indian River and Martin Counties.

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RECOMMENDED READING

Take advantage of material and literature in the library. Get into the habit of reading journals and you will soon become familiar with activities in the areas of your interest.

A sample of journals available in the Evans Library

Journal Oceanography Ocean Engineering Environmental Science Meteorology
American Scientist
X
X
X
X
Bulletin, American Meteorological Society
X
X
X
X

Bulletin of Marine Science
X
X
X
X
Deep Sea Research
X
X
-
X
Earth Interactions (electronic journal)
X
X
X
X
Ecology USA
X
-
X
-
Environmental Science and Technology
X
-
X
X
Environments
X
-
X
X
EOS, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union
X
X
X
X
Fathom
X
X
-
-
Hydrographic Journal
X
X
-
-
International Hydrographic Review
X
-
-
X
Journal of Atmospheric Science
X
-
-
X
Journal of Climate (available through ProQuest Direct database)
X
-
-
X
Journal of Environmental Engineering
-
X
X
-
Journal of Environmental Quality
X
-
X
-
Journal of Geophysical Research
X
-
X
X
Journal of Limnology and Oceanography
X
X
X
X
Journal of Marine Research
-
X
X
-
Journal of Ocean Engineering
-
X
-
-
Journal of Physical Oceanography
X
-
-
X
Marine Engineer Log
X
X
X
-
Marine Geodesy
X
X
-
-
Marine Pollution Bulletin
X
X
X
-
Marine Technology Society Journal
X
X
X
X
Marine Weather Log
X
X
X
X
Maritime Reporter
-
X
-
-
Nature
X
X
X
X
Naval Architect
-
X
-
-
New Scientist
X
X
X
X
Oceanus
X
X
X
X
Offshore
-
X
X
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Oil and Gas Journal
-
X
X
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Remote Sensing of Environment
X
-
X
X
Sea Frontiers (discontinued publication, backorders only)
X
X
X
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Sea Technology
X
X
X
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Science
X
X
X
X
Scientific American
X
X
X
X
Shore and Beach
X
X
X
-
Skin Diver
X
X
X
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Trans., Soc. Naval Arch. and Marine Eng.
-
X
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-

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OPPORTUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

A great number of opportunities exist within OES that will permit undergraduate students to broaden their training and to graduate with a résumé, not just a degree. These opportunities will provide a competitive advantage when the graduate applies to graduate school or seek employment in his or her respective field. These potential opportunities become a reality when you get involved with the various organizations, summer programs, volunteer research groups, or the undergraduate research program. A word of caution, however: Don’t join everything just so you can add lines to your résumé. Getting deeply involved in a limited number of projects is generally more advantageous than a superficial involvement in too many projects.

Professional Societies

American Geophysical Union
American Meteorological Society
Marine Technology Society
Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

Volunteer Programs

Marine Resources Council of East Florida
Students for Environmental Awareness
The Marine and Environmental Systems Student Association (MESSA)

Honor Societies

Sigma Xi (The Scientific Research Society)
Tau Beta Pi (Engineering Honor Society)
Tri Beta (National Biological Society)

Undergraduate Research Programs

Marine Field Projects

Summer Field Programs

National Science Foundation

Internships

Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Self-Guided Field Opportunities

Brevard County has a wide variety of natural habitats and nature preserves. You will visit some of these on various field trips in courses, but you may also wish to visit some of these on your own. Ask your professors if you need directions.

  • Florida Tech Botanical Garden: The world’s fourth largest collection of palms, plus a wide variety of other native and exotic plants. On campus.
  • Erma Nixon Hammock: Hardwood hammock with ancient trees. Guided and self-guided tours are available free of charge. West Melbourne, about 10 minutes from campus. Within bicycling distance.
  • Malabar Scrub: Scrub Jay habitat. Five mile southeast of campus.
  • Corrigan Ranch: Hiking, bird watching. Fifteen miles south of campus, near Fellsmere.
  • Coconut Point: Maritime hammock. Sea turtle egg laying watched in season (by appointment, late evening), or a fifteen minute hike through palmetto scrub and ancient oaks to a quiet beach on the lagoon (hiking boots recommended). Fifteen miles from campus.
  • Sebastian Inlet: Beautiful beaches, inlet connects the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River Lagoon. Great surfing spot, great fishing. Surfers love the big waves at “Monster Hole,” although the name may also refer to the shark population there. Thirty miles from campus.
  • Black Point Wildlife Refuge: One of the richest bird observation areas in the U.S. Alligators and other wildlife abound. Best seen in early morning or near dusk. Fifty miles from campus, near Titusville.
  • Emerald Forest: Hiking and wildlife, cypress forest. Trails not well marked, so hikers should be experienced. Forty miles from campus, west of Cocoa, near St. Johns River.
  • Enchanted Forest: Mature hardwood hammock. Fifty miles from campus, near Titusville.

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SOME DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

Ruben Aparicio
M.S. Physical Oceanography, 1986
Professor of Physical Oceanography
Universidad Oriente de Venezuela

Dr. Jeff Bomber, D.O.
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1987
Medical Practice
Findlay, OH

Dr. Eleana McDonald-Bueller
M.S. Environmental Science, 1992
University of Texas at Austin

Curtis Byrd
M.S. Engineering Management, 1983
Program Manager, Johnson Controls
Kennedy Space Center

Dr. Matthew Charette
B.S. Oceanography, 1994
Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

David Clayton
M.S. Ocean Engineering, 1983
General Manager
Vetrol Data Systems Inc.
Florida Institute of Technology Board of Trustees

James Egan
M.S. Environmental Science, 1997
Executive Director
Marine Resources Council of East Florida

Mark Geiger
M.S. Biological Oceanography, 1977
Supervisory Oceanographer
U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office

Dr. Gordon Grguric
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1993
University Professor, Stockton State University

Dr. Vernon Hillsman
M.S. Ocean Engineering, 1988
Associate Professor
Purdue University

Dr. Frank Muller-Karger
B.S. Biological Oceanography, 1979
Professor of Biological Oceanography
University of South Florida

Mike Kiefer
M.S. Environmental Science, 1985
Owner and Vice President
Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc.

Dr. Matthew Landau
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1983
University Professor, Stockton State University

Dr. Richard Legeckis
M.S. Physical Oceanography, 1968
Senior Scientist
National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Dr. Steve Morton
M.S. Oceanography, 1990
Research Oceanographer
Marine Biotoxins Program
National Ocean Service, NOAA

Larry Pollack
M.S. Environmental Science, 1985
Chemist/Senior Project Manager
U.S. DoD/Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA)

Dr. Michael P. Schultz
M.S. Ph.D. Ocean Engineering, 1992, 1999
Assistant Professor
United States Naval Academy

Daryl Slocum
B.S. Ocean Engineering, 1994
Vice President
SonTec Inc.

Joel Steward
M.S. Biological Oceanography, 1980
Program Manager
St. Johns River Water Management District

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TEACHING AND RESEARCH LABORATORIES

(Including facilities shared with other academic units)

Biological Oceanography Laboratory
Link 133

Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
Building 538

Geographic Information Systems Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 701)

Marine and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
Link 116

Marine and Environmental Computer Laboratory
Link 124

Marine and Environmental Instrumentation Laboratory
Link 137

Marine and Environmental Science Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 709)

Marine Geology and Geophysics Laboratory
Frueauff 122

Marine Materials Laboratory
Frueauff 127

Meteorology Laboratory
Link 207

Physical Oceanography Laboratory
Link 135

Ralph S. Evinrude Marine Operations Center
Anchorage

Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 706)

R/V Delphinus
Anchorage

Surf Mechanics Laboratory
Building 547

Underwater Technologies Laboratory
Frueauff 100

Vero Beach Marine Laboratory
Vero Beach

Waste Utilization Laboratory
Link 218

Marine Benthic Ecology Laboratory
Link 223

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OES HURRICANE PLAN NOTIFICATION CHECK LIST

When …
… Hurricane Watch Is Posted
… Hurricane Warning Is Posted

Who To Notify …

  • Thomas D. Waite (Department Head, OES) (321) 674-7334
  • John Windsor (Oceanography, Environ. Science) (321) 725-8914
  • Gary Zarillo (ARL) (321) 255-5074
  • Bill Battin (321) 725-4365


CHAIRS WILL NOTIFY APPROPRIATE STAFF

CONFIRM NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE

Director—

  • Implement hurricane preparation plan
  • 36-Hour notification (or Watch posted)
  • 24-Hour notification (or Warning posted)
  • Confirm notification
  • Move equipment away from windows and off the floor, if possible
  • Tape windows
  • Unplug and cover electrical equipment
  • Turn out lights and lock doors
  • Notify appropriate department director of completion


RESPONSIBILITY OF DEPARTMENT HEAD (OR COORDINATOR)

  • Make “Starting Action Report” to Command Center, ext. 8113
  • Confirm procedures completed
  • Make “Completed Actions Report” to Command Center
  • Send home non-essential personnel


AFTER ACTIONS (DEPARTMENT HEAD OR COORDINATOR)

  • When safe, make on-site inspection of all department facilities
  • Make “Damage and Casualty Report” to director of university relations
  • If possible, take pictures of damage (if any)

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OES COMPUTER SYSTEM HURRICANE PROCEDURE

The OES system is largely protected from the indirect effects of hurricanes, particularly lightning strikes, but here are several things we can do to protect our data and ourselves. For instance, make sure you keep copies of all important information on floppy disk, or tape and take them with you.

SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
PCs

1. Exit all programs, exit Windows
2. Turn off computer
3. Unplug computer and/or UPS system from mains supply
4. Move systems onto desks, cover with plastic sheets.

SUNS

1. Exit all programs, exit X-Windows
2. Hit “Stop-A” or “L1-A” (hold down both buttons),
3. Turn off computer
4. Unplug computer and/or UPS from mains supply,
5. Move systems onto desks, cover with plastic sheets,

PERIPHERALS

Printers, scanners: Unplug mains supply
Modems: Unplug modem from power and from phone line*
Network hubs: Switch off and unplug

*A lightning strike to a phone line will stop a modem in its tracks. A UPS will not protect it.

STARTUP PROCEDURES
All computer/peripherals

1. Turn on Network hubs (Instrumentation lab hub is plugged into UPS near door)
2. Turn on all PCs
3. Turn on all peripherals (remember to replug phone lines).

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