Ocean Engineering and Sciences

New Graduate Student Handbook

Message from Department Head

Dear Student,

We are very pleased that you are attending Florida Tech this fall, and I want to welcome you personally. Your studies will be administered by the Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences, located in the Link Building, named in honor of Edwin A. Link—a pioneering undersea explorer. The Department of Ocean Engineering and Sciences (OMES) is firmly dedicated to an integrated education, as you can see from our mission statement at the foot of this letter.

DMES is one of six departments in the College of Engineering & Computing, and is perhaps the most “applied science” academic unit within the college. Our 19 laboratories and facilities are spread out in four buildings on campus and at nearby sites, but you will find them easily enough on the campus map. Many of the professors you will have teach courses in at least two of our three programs: oceanography, ocean engineering, and environmental sciences (which includes meteorology). In addition, because we offer both undergraduate and graduate degrees, our students interact at all levels rather than in the isolated circumstances of the usual college or university. If your family or friends have Internet access, tell them about our home page on http://www.fit.edu/dmes.

We have about 250 undergraduate and graduate students, 15 all-Ph.D. regular faculty, more than a dozen adjunct faculty, and eight professional and staff members in the department. We are all here to support your education and research, and we want you to feel free to call upon any one of us as your studies progress. Although each of our programs have chairs (Dr. John G. Windsor, Jr., oceanography and environmental sciences, and Dr. Steve Wood, Ocean Engineering) who direct most of the academic activities, please feel free to contact me as necessary, too. My door is always open, and you are welcome at most any time.

We are pleased to have you as part of the DMES family.

Yours truly,

Thomas D. Wiate
Professor and Department Head

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DEPARTMENT HISTORY

Florida Institute of Technology was founded in 1958, and had earned SACS accreditation by 1964. In 1966, the Department of Oceanography was launched with an undergraduate program in physical oceanography. In 1968 the university established the Hydrospace Technical Institute, HTI, located in Cocoa Beach, which later was moved to Jensen Beach and the name changed to the School of Marine and Environmental Technology, SOMET. Biological and chemical oceanography curricula were added by 1971. The ocean engineering program began in 1972 when the department became the Department of Oceanography and Ocean Engineering; in 1979 ocean engineering became ABET accredited. SOMET’s faculty, students and programs were moved to Melbourne when the Jensen Beach Campus was closed in 1986.

Environmental science was added to the university’s offerings ca. 1976. In 1990, the program in environmental science was transferred to the department, at which time it was organized into the Department of Oceanography, Ocean Engineering and Environmental Science. The department became the Division of Marine and Environmental Systems (DMES), one of four divisions in the reorganized College of Engineering, in 1993. An additional baccalaureate curriculum in marine environmental studies became available in 1994; meteorology became part of the division’s undergraduate offerings in 1995. In 2000, DMES was renamed the College of Engineering & Computing’s Department of Marine and Environmental Systems, and in 2001 an undergraduate specialty in coastal zone management was added to the oceanography curriculum.

Graduate programs were established more or less in parallel with the undergraduate curricula: a Master's degree in physical oceanography was the only graduate program in the late 1960’s; master's in biological, chemical and geological oceanography were added in 1971, 1976 and 1980, respectively. An M.S. program in environmental science was initiated in 1976, ocean engineering was established by 1977, coastal zone management by 1978, environmental resource management in 1993, and meteorology in 1999. Doctor of philosophy degree programs started with oceanography in 1974, ocean engineering in 1987 and environmental science in 1990. Over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate degrees have been granted since our founding.

During the years 1997-2002, a capital campaign resulted in almost $2,500,000 in permanent endowments for DMES. Income from this endowment fund the Doherty Visiting Professor, the Link Fellowship, the Snowdon Fellowships, the Skelly Fellowships, the Clayton Fellowship and the Waters Fellowship – the latter largely underwritten by alumni, faculty and friends of the department. Growing endowments are the key to attracting and retaining the best students and faculty at Florida Tech.

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INTRODUCTION

Florida Tech will provide you with a wide variety of career and educational options. It will also provide you with the opportunity to develop and grow both as a graduate student and as a person. Graduate school, however, requires discipline, self-motivation and hard work.

Students who are successful in graduate school are not only self-motivated and hard working, they also know how to learn. They know that it is important to be organized and how to manage their time. They know how to study, take good notes and to read a textbook. They know how to learn new information and they know strategies that help them write good examinations. They also know how to get help when they need it.

This booklet and our Student Orientation program are intended to provide you with information on beginning your post-baccalaureate university experience, to ease your transition from college to graduate school, and to insure your successful matriculation into the research-level academic community. Our goals are to:

Introduce you to the physical environment of Florida Tech and to the Department of Marine and Environmental Systems’ faculty and staff.

Assist you in developing an understanding of the demands of graduate school: the academic expectations, social adjustments, and community standards of Florida Tech.

Acquaint you with the skills required to become independent learners, researchers and effective graduate students.

Introduce you to resources and services available at Florida Tech.

Provide you with opportunities to meet fellow students and establish relationships with members of the Florida Tech community.

Create an atmosphere that is educational, interactive and professional.

Assist you in achieving your career goals, dreams and objectives.

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WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM FLORIDA TECH

In most instances, people experience greater success when they know what to expect. At Florida Tech expect to find the following:

Varying class sizes
Most graduate class sizes can range from 7-20 students. While most classes are less than 15, class sizes vary depending on the course (the largest classes are usually the required core courses).

The need for critical thinking
You will be expected to learn and understand what you read. You will also be asked to draw conclusions, form opinions and evaluate the ideas of others.

Course syllabus
Each course you take will have a syllabus that outlines the course requirements, time schedules, textbooks, and percentage of the final grade assigned to tests, homework, term papers, oral presentations and laboratory exercises.

The need for personal responsibility
In graduate school, you have a tremendous amount of freedom. No one is monitoring your progress. No one is checking to see if you are going to class or doing your assignments. You are expected to be responsible for your own academic progress.

Consequences for low grades
Poor grades are a waste of time and money. If your GPA falls below 3.0 you will be placed on academic probation.

Less time in class/more emphasis on independent study

Your instructors will present material in class; however, you are expected to do most of your learning on your own. The general rule is: For every one hour you spend in class, you should spend three or more hours out of class reading, studying and completing assignments.

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WHAT FLORIDA TECH EXPECTS FROM YOU

Just as you have expectations of what a particular course may have to offer, your professors have expectations of what you’ll learn and accomplish. Your professors know what it takes to become a professional in your field, and they expect you to be committed to the challenge. To succeed:

  • Attend class regularly.
  • Read the assigned material before coming to class.
  • Bring the textbook to class, as faculty will be discussing many of the figures during the lectures.
  • Rewrite your notes after each lecture.
  • Look up lecture material on reference lists.
  • Review the previous lecture before the start of each class—this is a good time to resolve problems.
  • Start a personal glossary of terms.
  • Self-test yourself before exams.
  • Form a study group.

See your instructor immediately if you are having difficulty with the material—don’t wait until the exams!

As a student, you will develop a special relationship with your professors. This does not necessarily mean that it will be personal or wonderful. Rather, it means that it will require good working dynamics at the academic level. DMES faculty are professionals in their field, and your job is to learn from your professors. They are an integral part of your education, and have a great deal to teach you. Learn from them. Respect their knowledge, even if you don’t like their system of delivery. Learning from the negative can be just as valuable as learning from the positive. It is your responsibility to take maximum advantage of educational opportunities.

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POLICY STATEMENT ON PLAGIARISM

Examples of academic misconduct in the form of plagiarism have arisen within the department within the past several years. This statement is designed to explicitly define plagiarism and to describe the consequences to a student of committing plagiarism.

Plagiarism is described in a recent article in Science (26:631) as “the theft of ideas.” Another recent discussion on misconduct in science gives a fuller description (Schachman, H. K. 1993, Science 261:148-149).

Whereas plagiarism is described in the [National Academy of Sciences] report as “using the ideas or words of another person without giving appropriate credit,” Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary defines “plagiarize” as follows: “to steal and pass off as one’s own (the ideas or works of another); to present as one’s own an idea or product derived from an existing source.” Because of the increasing focus on “intellectual property” in recent years, plagiarism is best defined as “misappropriation of intellectual property.” Defined in this way, plagiarism not only encompasses those cases in which sentences or phrases are used without attribution but also includes unauthorized use of ideas, data, and interpretation obtained during the course of the grant review process or the review of scientific papers being considered for publication (Schachman, op.cit.).

At Florida Tech, plagiarism constitutes grounds for academic dismissal from the university. The university catalog states: “Student conduct that violates the legal or ethical standards of the university may result in mandatory withdrawal from all classes and denial of permission to register in future terms for either a definite or indefinite period of time. Examples of misconduct that could result in these actions include cheating, plagiarism...”

A student is expected to use his or her own words in any required paper or laboratory report, and if there is a use of someone else’s words, ideas, data, figures, or any other intellectual property, it must be properly identified and attributed to the author. The verbatim use of any sentence or phrase from another person’s work must be identified by quotation marks and by a proper citation to the original work from which it was taken. A change of one word in a sentence does not alter the fact that you are copying another individual’s work and this still would constitute plagiarism. However, some degree of similarity to the original work is generally inevitable when you are reporting about the results of someone else’s work.

To insure that there is no doubt about the issue, several illustrative examples are provided below. The first sentence from the abstract to a paper by J. M. Burkholder et al. (J.M. Burkholder, et al., Nature, 358:407410) is used.

A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.

If you were to say in your paper:
A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.

or :

There has been a worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years which has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.

then these statements would constitute plagiarism. The first case is a verbatim inclusion of an author’s text without attribution. The second changes only a few words, and the entire thought structure of the original author remains intact.

A correct attribution would be:
Burkholder, et al. (1992) have noted “A worldwide increase in toxic phytoplankton blooms over the past 20 years has coincided with increasing reports of fish diseases and deaths of unknown cause.”

Describing this information in your own words might take the form:
There has been a sharp increase in the number of toxic phytoplankton blooms from many areas of the coastal ocean in the last 20 years. The pattern of increase in toxic algal blooms appears correlated with incidents of fish diseases and unexplained fish mortality (Burkholder et al., 1992).

Note that even though the text has been greatly changed, the basic information is derived from Burkholder et al. (1992) and must be attributed.

Copying figures for inclusion in a term paper without attributing a source would also be plagiarism.

A student found to have committed plagiarism will receive a grade of zero on the paper and an F for the course, and the case will be turned over to the university administration for possible dismissal from the university.

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M.S. THESIS-OPTION PROGRAM CHECKLIST

Before attending the university, read the DMES home page and be certain that the expertise that resides at Florida Tech meets your interests.

Contact faculty with whom you might work, before deciding to attend.

First semester: Meet with program chair and complete the Master’s Degree Program Plan (no later than one month prior to the time nine semester credit hours of graduate course work have been completed).

Each semester until a major professor is selected: Meet with the program chair and complete the Course Registration form. Each semester after selecting faculty advisor, meet with major professor and complete the Course Registration form

Before taking any thesis credits: Select M.S. Thesis Committee and hold a preliminary meeting.

Schedule a committee meeting and present the thesis proposal.

Each semester thereafter: Meet with major professor and register for at least three hours of thesis credits. Fewer than three hours of thesis registration is permitted ONLY in the semester of graduation (http://www.fit.edu/AcadRes/graduate/gradpol/gr4.html#4.10).

In the first month, two semesters before graduation: Petition to Graduate. Pay thesis-binding bill at same time, if you can. Carefully read bottom of letter sent by the Registrar in response to your Petition to Graduate. The remaining requirements are listed there.

Graduation Semester:

  • Bring the first few pages of your thesis, and the printed page with your first figure, table, chart or other exhibit, to the Office of Graduate Programs for formatting approval.
  • Present draft thesis to major professor at least eight weeks before the semester ends, and to entire committee at least four weeks in advance if you count on graduating in the current semester. Schedule a Thesis Defense with your committee.
  • Submit Thesis Defense Announcement form to the Office of Graduate Programs at least two weeks in advance (http://www.fit.edu/AcadRes/graduate/thesis.htm). 
  • Bring thesis draft for review before the thesis defense when bringing Thesis Defense Announcement form to the Office of Graduate Programs. 
  • Thesis Defense Examination Report is signed by all committee members at the defense and submitted to Gradate Programs Office by the department.
  • Present the results of your work at the Graduate Student Seminar. Attendance at the Graduate Student Seminar is required of all DMES graduate students.

Consult the Graduate Policy Manual regularly (http://www.fit.edu/AcadRes/graduate/gradpol/).

Remember the time limit for an M.S. from start to finish is seven years. If you take longer, your credits will become overage and you may be required to take more courses and/or to take a written examination to demonstrate current knowledge.

FORMS LIST:

  • Master’s Degree Program Plan
  • Course Registration
  • Petition to Graduate
  • Thesis Defense Announcement
  • Thesis Defense Examination Report
  • Change of Grade

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DEPARTMENTAL PROCEDURE ON GRADUATE CREDITS BEYOND THE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS

From time to time, graduate students do not complete all required courses within the time limits set by general university policy. Each department is charged with establishing a procedure for updating those course credits that have been taken outside the time limits. DMES procedure is as follows:

Doctor of Philosophy

  • Five years from the end of the academic semester during which the Comprehensive Examination is successfully completed, all course credits are beyond the time limits.
  • If more than five (5) years as defined above, doctoral students must re-take the entire Comprehensive Examination to revalidate their courses.
  • If another Comprehensive Examination is administered, a separate Examination Report form is processed through normal channels to indicate successful passing of the re-examination.

Master of Science

  • Seven years from starting the program to graduation, credits are beyond the time limits. For example, students who take the first course that applies to their program in Fall Semester 2000 must graduate by Summer Term 2007.
  • Students, whose course credits are beyond these time limits, must take a written examination to verify current knowledge in the subject area for each course beyond the time limit.
  • The faculty member that originally taught the course will give the written examination, or in case the faculty member is no longer available for this purpose, then the appropriate DMES program chair will conduct the written examination. The standard for a written examination is generally the same as a final examination in a course taught at the university, i.e. a two-hour examination. The written examination will be kept in the student’s departmental file and made available to SACS during accreditation visits, if requested.
  • Once the faculty member conducting the examination is satisfied, he or she will inform the department head. After all examinations are successfully completed and reported, the department head will inform the director of graduate programs by written memorandum through the College of Engineering & Computing’s associate dean for academics. Copies of the memorandum will be provided to the student, their committee, and the program chair.
  • The program chair, department head and dean of the College of Engineering & Computing must approve all waivers of the Statute of Limitations.

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OPPORTUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

A great number of opportunities exist within DMES that will permit students to broaden their training and to graduate with a résumé, not just a degree. These opportunities will provide a competitive advantage when the graduate applies to another graduate school or seek employment in his or her respective field. These potential opportunities become a reality when you get involved with the various organizations, summer programs, volunteer research groups, or the undergraduate research program. Getting deeply involved in a limited number of projects is generally more advantageous than a superficial involvement in too many projects.

Professional Societies

  • American Geophysical Union
  • American Meteorological Society
  • Marine Technology Society
  • Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

Volunteer Research Programs

  • Marine Resources Council of East Florida
  • Students for Environmental Awareness
  • Undergraduate Research Programs
  • Marine Field Projects
  • Summer Field Programs
  • National Science Foundation

Internships

  • Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Self-Guided Field Opportunities

Brevard County has a wide variety of natural habitats and nature preserves. You will visit some of these on various field trips in courses, but you may also wish to visit some of these on your own. Ask your professors if you need directions.

  • Florida Tech Botanical Garden: The world’s fourth largest collection of palms, plus a wide variety of other native and exotic plants. On campus.
  • Erma Nixon Hammock: Hardwood hammock with ancient trees. Guided and self-guided tours are available free of charge. West Melbourne, about 10 minutes from campus. Within bicycling distance.
  • Malabar Scrub: Scrub Jay habitat. Five mile southeast of campus.
  • Corrigan Ranch: Hiking, bird watching. Fifteen miles south of campus, near Fellsmere.
  • Coconut Point: Maritime hammock. Sea turtle egg laying watched in season (by appointment, late evening), or a fifteen minute hike through palmetto scrub and ancient oaks to a quiet beach on the lagoon (hiking boots recommended). Fifteen miles from campus.
  • Sebastian Inlet: Beautiful beaches, inlet connects the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River Lagoon. Great surfing spot, great fishing. Surfers love the big waves at “Monster Hole,” although the name may also refer to the shark population there. Thirty miles from campus.
  • Black Point Wildlife Refuge: One of the richest bird observation areas in the U.S. Alligators and other wildlife abound. Best seen in early morning or near dusk. Fifty miles from campus, near Titusville.
  • Emerald Forest: Hiking and wildlife, cypress forest. Trails not well marked, so hikers should be experienced. Forty miles from campus, west of Cocoa, near St. Johns River.
  • Enchanted Forest: Mature hardwood hammock. Fifty miles from campus, near Titusville.

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RECOMMENDED READING

A sample of journals available in the Evans Library

Journal Oceanography Ocean Engineering Environmental Science Meteorology
American Scientist
X
X
X
X
Bulletin, American Meteorological Society
X
X
X
X

Bulletin of Marine Science
X
X
X
X
Deep Sea Research
X
X
-
X
Earth Interactions (electronic journal)
X
X
X
X
Ecology USA
X
-
X
-
Environmental Science and Technology
X
-
X
X
Environments
X
-
X
X
EOS, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union
X
X
X
X
Fathom
X
X
-
-
Hydrographic Journal
X
X
-
-
International Hydrographic Review
X
-
-
X
Journal of Atmospheric Science
X
-
-
X
Journal of Climate (available through ProQuest Direct database)
X
-
-
X
Journal of Environmental Engineering
-
X
X
-
Journal of Environmental Quality
X
-
X
-
Journal of Geophysical Research
X
-
X
X
Journal of Limnology and Oceanography
X
X
X
X
Journal of Marine Research
-
X
X
-
Journal of Ocean Engineering
-
X
-
-
Journal of Physical Oceanography
X
-
-
X
Marine Engineer Log
X
X
X
-
Marine Geodesy
X
X
-
-
Marine Pollution Bulletin
X
X
X
-
Marine Technology Society Journal
X
X
X
X
Marine Weather Log
X
X
X
X
Maritime Reporter
-
X
-
-
Nature
X
X
X
X
Naval Architect
-
X
-
-
New Scientist
X
X
X
X
Oceanus
X
X
X
X
Offshore
-
X
X
-
Oil and Gas Journal
-
X
X
-
Remote Sensing of Environment
X
-
X
X
Sea Frontiers (discontinued publication, backorders only)
X
X
X
-
Sea Technology
X
X
X
-
Science
X
X
X
X
Scientific American
X
X
X
X
Shore and Beach
X
X
X
-
Skin Diver
X
X
X
-
Trans., Soc. Naval Arch. and Marine Eng.
-
X
-
-

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SOME DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

Ruben Aparicio
M.S. Physical Oceanography, 1986
Professor of Physical Oceanography
Universidad Oriente de Venezuela

Dr. Jeff Bomber, D.O.
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1987
Medical Practice
Findlay, OH

Dr. Eleana McDonald-Bueller
M.S. Environmental Science, 1992
University of Texas at Austin

Curtis Byrd
M.S. Engineering Management, 1983
Program Manager, Johnson Controls
Kennedy Space Center

Dr. Matthew Charette
B.S. Oceanography, 1994
Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

David Clayton
M.S. Ocean Engineering, 1983
General Manager
Vetrol Data Systems Inc.
Florida Institute of Technology Board of Trustees

James Egan
M.S. Environmental Science, 1997
Executive Director
Marine Resources Council of East Florida

Mark Geiger
M.S. Biological Oceanography, 1977
Supervisory Oceanographer
U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office

Dr. Gordon Grguric
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1993
University Professor, Stockton State University

Dr. Vernon Hillsman
M.S. Ocean Engineering, 1988
Associate Professor
Purdue University

Dr. Frank Muller-Karger
B.S. Biological Oceanography, 1979
Professor of Biological Oceanography
University of South Florida

Mike Kiefer
M.S. Environmental Science, 1985
Owner and Vice President
Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc.

Dr. Matthew Landau
Ph.D. Oceanography, 1983
Professor, Stockton State University

Dr. Richard Legeckis
M.S. Physical Oceanography, 1968
Senior Scientist
National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Dr. Steve Morton
M.S. Oceanography, 1990
Research Oceanographer
Marine Biotoxins Program
National Ocean Service, NOAA

Larry Pollack
M.S. Environmental Science, 1985
Chemist/Senior Project Manager
U.S. DoD/Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA)

Dr. Michael P. Schultz
M.S. Ph.D. Ocean Engineering, 1992, 1999
Assistant Professor
United States Naval Academy

Daryl Slocum
B.S. Ocean Engineering, 1994
Vice President
SonTec Inc.

Joel Steward
M.S. Biological Oceanography, 1980
Program Manager
St. Johns River Water Management District

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GUIDELINES FOR SMALL BOATS

Florida Institute of Technology
Revised in September, 2005

The small boats are to be used for faculty approved research in the Indian River Lagoon, Lake Washington , and adjacent waterways. Any student, faculty member or research technician/engineer anticipating the need for a small boat for teaching or research work must first be certified through the Florida Tech procedures and he or she MUST have completed a safe boating course from either the Power Squadron or Coast Guard Auxiliary. This is to allow safe, effective use of vessels with reasonable care of school equipment.

To reserve a small boat, you will need to call Tom Haman (723-0733), dockmaster, who is located at the Evinrude Marine Center ( Anchorage ), to check on boat availability at least 24 hours in advance. You must fill out a Small Boat Request form (available in the Department of Marine and Environmental Systems (DMES) or Department of Biological Sciences front office) and have it approved by your advisor or proper authorized person. The form is to be presented to the Evinrude Marine Center dockmaster at the Anchorage to obtain the combination for the small boat supplies locker and the boat.

You may gain access to the small boat supplies on the day of your research trip or on Friday (for weekend trips) by obtaining the key from the dockmaster during work hours (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.).

Should your research work involve the handling of nets (otter, trawl, plankton or seine), your boat must display a Florida Tech research sign. When doing this type of research, you will need to have on you an appropriate permit authorizing your activities. You are also required to have on board a chart of the area being navigated and a GPS receiver.

BOATING PROCEDURES
You need to provide your own gas. You must add one pint of 50W outboard engine oil per six-gallons of regular gas and mix well. Failure to do so will result in engine seizure and costly repairs.

If the destination is of some distance, it is more practical to trailer your boat to your research site. Procedures for pulling trailers will be covered during your check-out. When the boat is to be trailered, it should not be loaded with gear and speed not to exceed 50 mph.

The locker has supplies for small boats: life jackets (one per person), fire extinguishers, anchors with line, first aid kits, oars (one required per boat), signal kits and Florida Tech research signs. Lights are also to be carried and used after dark, or in restricted visibility (rain, fog, etc).

The gas tank should be placed in the bottom of the boat near the rear seat. The gas line hook-up is on the port side (left) of the engine. Inspect the engine mounts for tightens. To lower the engine from the tilted position, you must push the tilt-run lever into the run position; pull the engine up to unlock and then lower into the water. Leave the tilt-run lever in the run position while operating your boat. When operating at slow speeds in shallow waters, the tilt-run lever should be lifted into the tilt position. This reduces engine damage in the event of grounding. The boathouse is shallow, therefore, to prevent damage to the cooling system from sucking mud, boats should be carefully moved by hand and oar to the mouth of the boathouse before starting engines.

Before starting the engine, set the shift arm in the vertical-neutral position. Squeeze the bulb on the gas line until gas will no longer pump freely. Pull choke/primer twice, gently engage the pull-start until it locks, and then use long continuous strokes to start the engine. Jerking the pull-start will tear the engaging mechanism's lever arm. When the engine starts, put in the choke. Once the engine has warmed up, should it die, you will generally not need to rechoke. Set the throttle to idle position before shifting to forward or reverse.

After a long period of running idle, it is good for the engine to be run at higher speed for a period to clean the plugs. Plan to do this before shutting down. Do not run continuously at full throttle. Slightly faster than plane is a safe, fuel-efficient speed.

Be particularly alert in Crane Creek for manatees, and observe the no-wake law inside Melbourne Harbor .

Life jackets can be stored underneath the seat during your trip. Do not use them as seat cushions. The anchor line can be attached to the forward bow cleat in the Dixie . The fire extinguishers should be stored securely. Registration numbers are on the forward port and starboard bow of each boat; check these numbers before you take out your boat and make sure they are not worn off.

Upon returning from your trip, as you near the boathouse, pull the gas line off to allow all gas in the engine to be burned. This usually takes about a minute. Tie the boat securely to the dock. After the engine dies, raise the tilt-run lever to its tilt position and lift the engine to its full tilt position. Restore all gear to its proper place in the locker, and sign back in on the Float Plan Log. The hose for cleaning up the boat is located on the south end of the boathouse; bail bucked and scrub brushes are in the top locker. The locker must be securely fastened/locked before leaving for your research trip and again when you restore all equipment at the end of your trip. Return locker key and filled check out form immediately (leave them in the drop off box if the dockmaster is not on duty).

No small boats (McKee and Whaler included) are to go out when small craft are cautioned to stay in port (small craft advisories).

EMERGENCY
In the event of an accident or injury, render required first aid on the scene, and secure professional medical attention as needed. Any such incident is to be reported immediately to Captain Richard Gurlek (432-5365, 725-6288 or 768-7318) or Thomas Harman (723-0733), or Florida Tech Security Office (674-8111).

Any mechanical or equipment problems are to be reported to the dockmaster directly or on the Comments/Report section of the Check out form after returning.

Florida Tech's liability insurance covers Florida Tech-certified small boat operations while operating properly equipped boats, in compliance with State and Federal regulations. Negligent or reckless operation may void that coverage and, without question, leave the operator open to personal liability.

It is our intention to support the research and teaching needs of students and faculty to the greatest reasonable degree. Safe, efficient operation will require cooperation, observance of Federal and State Law, and recognition of the potential disaster involved in marine operations. Failure to follow these guidelines or to exercise prudence may result in the loss of boating privileges.

REMEMBER, ABSOLUTELY NO ALCOHOL OR DRUGS ARE EVER ALLOWED!

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PROCEDURES FOR RESERVING SMALL BOATS AND CELL PHONES

1. To reserve a small boat, call Tom Haman, dockmaster, at the Evinrude Marine Center (Anchorage) to check on boat availability.

2. Then, go to DMES front office (Room 110) to pick up a Boat Check-Out/Check-In form, which must be completed to include appropriate index number and signed by authorized faculty member.

3. On the day before your trip (if leaving early in the morning) or the same day of your trip, you must also stop by the DMES office to fill out a Cell Phone Check-Out/Check-In form and pick up a cell phone to take with you on your trip in case of an emergency.

4. Please turn in a photocopy of both the completed and signed Boat Check-Out/Check-In and Cell Phone Check-Out/Check-In forms to the DMES front office at the time you pick up the cell phone.

5. The original Boat and Cell Phone Check-Out/Check-In forms must be turned in to Tom Haman, dockmaster, at the time you pick up the boat.

If you have any questions regarding the boats, or if you encounter any problems while using the boats, please contact Tom Haman at 723-0733.

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DMES HURRICANE PLAN NOTIFICATION CHECK LIST

When …
… Hurricane Watch Is Posted
… Hurricane Warning Is Posted

Who To Notify …

  • Thomas D. Waite (Department Head, DMES) (321) 674-7344
  • John Windsor (Oceanography, Environ. Science) (321) 725-8914
  • Gary Zarillo (ARL) (321) 255-5074
  • Bill Battin (321) 725-4365


CHAIRS WILL NOTIFY APPROPRIATE STAFF

CONFIRM NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE

Director—

  • Implement hurricane preparation plan
  • 36-Hour notification (or Watch posted)
  • 24-Hour notification (or Warning posted)
  • Confirm notification
  • Move equipment away from windows and off the floor, if possible
  • Tape windows
  • Unplug and cover electrical equipment
  • Turn out lights and lock doors
  • Notify appropriate department director of completion


RESPONSIBILITY OF DEPARTMENT HEAD (OR COORDINATOR)

  • Make “Starting Action Report” to Command Center, ext. 8113
  • Confirm procedures completed
  • Make “Completed Actions Report” to Command Center
  • Send home non-essential personnel


AFTER ACTIONS (DEPARTMENT HEAD OR COORDINATOR)

  • When safe, make on-site inspection of all department facilities
  • Make “Damage and Casualty Report” to director of university relations
  • If possible, take pictures of damage (if any)

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DMES COMPUTER SYSTEM HURRICANE PROCEDURE

The DMES system is largely protected from the indirect effects of hurricanes, particularly lightning strikes, but here are several things we can do to protect our data and ourselves. For instance, make sure you keep copies of all important information on floppy disk, or tape and take them with you.

SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
PCs

1. Exit all programs, exit Windows
2. Turn off computer
3. Unplug computer and/or UPS system from mains supply
4. Move systems onto desks, cover with plastic sheets.

SUNS

1. Exit all programs, exit X-Windows
2. Hit “Stop-A” or “L1-A” (hold down both buttons),
3. Turn off computer
4. Unplug computer and/or UPS from mains supply,
5. Move systems onto desks, cover with plastic sheets,

PERIPHERALS

Printers, scanners: Unplug mains supply
Modems: Unplug modem from power and from phone line*
Network hubs: Switch off and unplug

*A lightning strike to a phone line will stop a modem in its tracks. A UPS will not protect it.

STARTUP PROCEDURES
All computer/peripherals

1. Turn on Network hubs (Instrumentation lab hub is plugged into UPS near door)
2. Turn on all PCs
3. Turn on all peripherals (remember to replug phone lines).

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TEACHING AND RESEARCH LABORATORIES

(Including facilities shared with other academic units)

Biological Oceanography Laboratory
Link 133

Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
Building 538

Geographic Information Systems Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 701)

Marine and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
Link 116

Marine and Environmental Computer Laboratory
Link 124

Marine and Environmental Instrumentation Laboratory
Link 137

Marine and Environmental Science Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 709)

Marine Geology and Geophysics Laboratory
Frueauff 122

Marine Materials Laboratory
Frueauff 127

Meteorology Laboratory
Link 207

Physical Oceanography Laboratory
Link 135

Ralph S. Evinrude Marine Operations Center
Anchorage

Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics Laboratory
Building 407 (Room 706)

R/V Delphinus
Anchorage

Surf Mechanics Laboratory
Building 547

Underwater Technologies Laboratory
Frueauff 100

Vero Beach Marine Laboratory
Vero Beach

Waste Utilization Laboratory
Link 218

Marine Benthic Ecology Laboratory
Link 223

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Research Vessel Delphinus

L.O.A. 60’

BEAM 20’

DRAFT 5.5’

AFTER WORK DECK 15’ X 10’

PROPULSION Twin 671 Detroit Diesels

GENERATOR 30 kW John Deere 220/110

RANGE 800 NM at 8 KTS

ENDURANCE 3 days

POTABLE WATER 400 Gals + 400 Gals/Day Water Maker

ACCOMMODATIONS Berthing for 10 in 2 air Conditioned cabins

DECK HANDLING 2 Hydraulic Winches, 1-ton lift with 1000' 1/4" cable on aft boom. 1 hydraulic winch, 500 lb lift with 300' 1/4" torque balanced cable. 1 hydraulic communication cable winch for c.t.d. with 1500’ of cable.

ELECTRONICS

2 SSB (ICOM, Kenwood)
2 VHF (SITEX, Kenwood)
2 RADAR (72 MI. Furuno, 24 MI. Raytheon)
1 Sitex Flasher (Shallow Water – Fathometer)
1 Furuno COLOR Fathometer TO 6000’
1 Lowrange Loran C
2 GPS (Furuno, Sitex)
2 GPS Interphased Plotters
1 ADF (Furuno)
1 Salt Water Temperature Sensor (Dytek)
1 Simrad Hydrographic Surveyor
Cellular Phone And Fax

COMPUTER SOFTWARE

Gateway 486/66, 17” monitor, color printer QFAX (Real-Time Weather Satellite Info), Windows, MS Office, X.B.T., C.T.D., Endeco, Station Weather

The Delphinus is an economical near-shore research vessel capable of handling a variety of functions. She works as an educational tool to the community (oceanographic field trips for local schools and groups) and for teaching oceanography, ocean engineering, environmental science and marine biology at Florida Tech. Her missions include buoy and mooring deployment, trawls, grabs, plankton tows, long lining for shark tagging, c.t.d. water quality, and a variety of ocean engineering projects, including towed and independent submersibles. Delphinus works comfortably in up to 5-foot seas and provides a safe, stable platform.
Inquiries should be made to:

Captain Richard Gurlek
c/o Office of the Dean, College of Engineering & Computing
Florida Institute of Technology
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, Florida 32901
(321) 768-8020

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